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Injection Molding Composites ©

2 Notes ©

Patentpedia Index 

3/23/2016 through 10/20/2015

1 Patent Abstracts

1 Patent Titles

1 Topics

0 Subtopics

2 Notes

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1 Topics

D. Injection Molding Applications   (1 Topics) (0 Subtopics) (1 Notes )   (101 Patent Titles )   (0 Patent Abstracts ) (3/23/2016)

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2 Notes

1. Injection Molding Composites

2. Pressure Molding

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2. Pressure Molding

In closed mold composite material manufacturing, tooling that is generally used in the manufacturing process should be able to sustain very high cavity pressures that are required to ensure complete laminate saturation and cure the laminates involved in the manufacturing process. In addition, closed mold composite manufacturing may have a long manufacturing cycle because of limits on the injection pressures that the tooling can withstand. Moreover, the tooling that is used in composite manufacturing may have a short life due to the amount of pressure-induced stress that is applied to the tooling with the pressurization of the tooling cavity. Thus, the cycle for composite manufacturing may be long, and the costs of manufacturing may be high, as the cost for manufacturing and replacing the tooling, due to its short shelf life, may be expensive and/or increase the costs of manufacturing.

Escribano and Escribano, US Patent 9,162,385 (10/20/2015)

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1. Injection Molding Composites

During injection molding,  matrix materials are injected into tooling cavities within a pressure chamber, such as an autoclave, and the composites are cured in the pressure chamber.  The pressure differential between the inside of the tooling cavities and the outside environment are minimized by injecting the matrix material into the tooling cavity inside the one or more pressurized chambers. By minimizing the pressure differential between the tooling cavity and the environment immediately around the tooling cavity and curing the composite materials in a pressure chamber, and pressurizing the entire chamber instead of only pressurizing the tooling, the tooling design may be simplified, the cost of manufacturing reduced, and the production streamlined.  Moreover, by applying pressure to the entire chamber, instead of just into the tooling cavity, the quality of the final composite product may be increased through the use of higher pressures, for example, by eliminating bubbles and surface imperfections of the final composite.

“Composite materials may include, but are not limited to, reinforced fiber or other laminate materials, which may comprise fiberglass or carbon fibers, resin materials that may be combined with the fiber materials to form the final composite, epoxy resins, other thermosetting plastics, thermoplastics, Kevlar, and aramid, among other advanced composite materials.”

Escribano and Escribano, US Patent 9,162,385 (10/20/2015)        

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Copyright 2016 by Roger D. Corneliussen.
No part of this transmission is to be duplicated in any manner or forwarded by electronic mail without the express written permission of Roger D. Corneliussen

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Roger D. Corneliussen, Editor
Professor Emeritus
Materials Engineering
Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
Editor
Maro Publications
327 Huffman Drive
Exton, PA 19341
Telephone: 610 363 1533
Email:
cornelrd@bee.net
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