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Polypropylene (PP) ©

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8 Patent Titles

Patentpedia Index 

6/1/2016 through 6/26/2012

Latest Entry from Week #21, 2016   (5/24/2016)

* Note:  This collection is not complete.  Items may be missing and whole weeks may not be covered.  "Perfection is not of this world!"  Please send Maro missing patent numbers  for inclusion.  Experts are invited to send important, basic patents  or patents on new Topics. (RDC 4/29/2016)
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2 Topics

Polymers (C)

Polyolefins (D

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1 Subtopics

Polypropylene (PP) Applications (E)

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1 Notes

1. Polypropylene (PP)

Beginning

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1. Polypropylene (PP) 

“Polypropylene (PP), also known as polypropene, is a thermoplastic polymer used in a wide variety of applications including packaging and labeling, textiles (e.g., ropes, thermal underwear and carpets), stationery, plastic parts and reusable containers of various types, laboratory equipment, loudspeakers, automotive components, and polymer banknotes. An addition polymer made from the monomer propylene, it is rugged and unusually resistant to many chemical solvents, bases and acids.

In 2008, the global market for polypropylene had a volume of 45.1 million tonnes, which led to a turnover of about $65 billion. .

Most commercial polypropylene is isotactic and has an intermediate level of crystallinity between that of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Polypropylene is normally tough and flexible, especially when copolymerized with ethylene. This allows polypropylene to be used as an engineering plastic, competing with materials such as ABS. Polypropylene is reasonably economical, and can be made translucent when uncolored but is not as readily made transparent as polystyrene, acrylic, or certain other plastics. It is often opaque or colored using pigments. Polypropylene has good resistance to fatigue.

The melting of polypropylene occurs as a range, so a melting point is determined by finding the highest temperature of a differential scanning calorimetry chart. Perfectly isotactic PP has a melting point of 171 °C (340 °F). Commercial isotactic PP has a melting point that ranges from 160 to 166 °C (320 to 331 °F), depending on atactic material and crystallinity. Syndiotactic PP with a crystallinity of 30% has a melting point of 130 °C (266 °F).

The melt flow rate (MFR) or melt flow index (MFI) is a measure of molecular weight of polypropylene. The measure helps to determine how easily the molten raw material will flow during processing. Polypropylene with higher MFR will fill the plastic mold more easily during the injection or blow-molding production process. As the melt flow increases, however, some physical properties, like impact strength, will decrease.

There are three general types of polypropylene: homopolymer, random copolymer, and block copolymer. The comonomer is typically used with ethylene. Ethylene-propylene rubber or EPDM added to polypropylene homopolymer increases its low temperature impact strength. Randomly polymerized ethylene monomer added to polypropylene homopolymer decreases the polymer crystallinity and makes the polymer more transparent.”

Wikipedia, Polypropylene (PP), (6/26/2012)

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Copyright 2016 by Roger D. Corneliussen.
No part of this transmission is to be duplicated in any manner or forwarded by electronic mail without the express written permission of Roger D. Corneliussen

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Roger D. Corneliussen, Editor
Professor Emeritus
Materials Engineering
Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
Editor
Maro Publications
Telephone: 610 363 1533
Email:
cornelrd@bee.net
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